SUNY Cortland Counselor Breakfast, Nov. 5

We would like to invite you to join us for breakfast!

SUNY Cortland will be having an informational breakfast in New York City for school counselors at the SUNY Center for Student Recruitment.  We will be presenting on all areas of the college including admissions, EOP, student life, & financial aid.  Details are as follows:

Cortland in NYC – Breakfast with School Counselors
Date:
Wednesday, November 5 2014
Time: 9:00am – 11:00am
Location: SUNY Center for Student Recruitment (CSR)
33 West 42nd Street (across from Bryant Park)
New York, New York 10036

Feel free to bring your intern, secretaries, or anyone that could benefit from this information.  This is a great opportunity to learn more about SUNY Cortland!

Please register for the event by clicking here: Cortland in NYC BreakfastYou can also register by calling our office at 607-753-4711.

We look forward to seeing you soon!

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HESC School Counselor Workshop, NYC Dec. 5 & 12

There is time to register for the HESC School Counselor Workshop in your area.  Don’t miss this opportunity to learn about the financial aid process and updates to assist your students with the financial aid process.

The free half day training includes a free breakfast buffet.  The agendas are attached for your review. Registration is required for the training.

Click here to learn more and register.

Download Fordham’s meeting agenda

Download FIT’s meeting agenda

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November Counselor Workshops from CACNY

At this time of the year we are all scrambling to help our students find the best future opportunities for themselves. The two upcoming events below will help you do that.

November 13th: Writing Recommendation letters
Hear from admissions on how to improve your letters and what do they need to hear from you!

Our monthly meeting will be that morning at Columbia University. Following that meeting we are offering this Professional Development Workshop on Writing Recommendation Letters.

This will be from approximately 12:30 until 2pm.

Please email Marilyn directly at events@cacnyinc.org with your contact information clearly indicated, how many from your organization/school, will be attending and whether or not those attending are from member organizations.

This workshop is free for members and there is a $10 fee for non members.

November 14th: Educational Opportunity Program Breakfast
8am to 11am at SUNY College of Optometry 42nd street between Fifth and Sixth Avanues

Co-sponsored by CACNY and SUNY systems administration.

Organized by Janice Rivera, Director of Academic Support Programs, SUNY, Farmingdale State College. Hosted by Beryl Jeffers, Director SUNY Center for Student Recruitment in NYC.

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Predicting Where Students Go

From Inside Higher Ed:

A trio of senior college enrollment officials gave a peek into how they decide which students to recruit. The process now involves number-crunching students’ demographic and economic information — not just sending chipper ambassadors to every nearby high school, mailing glossy books to students’ homes and relying on gut instincts.

The discussion, during a session at the annual meeting of the National Association for College Admission Counseling, was one of many to take place here about how to hunt for students. The search for students involves a web of data points, formulas and consulting firms that perhaps few parents and students are aware of.

Read the full article here.

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Community College Students Face a Very Long Road to Graduation

From the New York Times:

On a Friday afternoon last spring, Dennis D’Amelio, an artist and teacher in late middle age was presiding over a class in color theory at LaGuardia Community College, whose location in the immigrant hub of western Queens makes it one of the most ethnically diverse colleges in the country. It was the end of the semester and the students were tackling a challenging assignment — a test of the reactive properties of color, which required the meticulous rendering of small sequential blocks of paint, an exercise that would serve as a lesson in deductive reasoning and consume hours.

Vladimir de Jesus, a child of Puerto Rican parentage and Soviet enthusiasms, had arrived early with various supplies and considerable energy. At 23, he had been at LaGuardia sporadically over six years, amassing fewer than half of the credits he needed to progress to a four-year college.

Read the full story here.

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Send in your comments to U.S. DOE about FAFSA college lists

The US Department of Education recently announced that it is accepting comments from the public about how to improve the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) process.  Some NACAC members have been concerned that some colleges use the list of colleges that students supply on their FAFSA forms in an attempt to ascertain the students’ likelihood of attending the institution if accepted.

NACAC is planning on submitting comments, which are below, with the Department encouraging them to modify the FAFSA in one of the following ways:

1.    Refrain from sending students’ college lists to the colleges; or
2.    Inform students that their lists can be sent to colleges (preferably in alphabetical or random order), and allow students to either opt-in or opt-out of such a transmission.

NACAC encourages you to submit your own comments.  If you would like to do so, please send them to ICDocketMgr@ed.gov or Director of the Information Collection Clearance Division, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., LBJ, Mailstop L-OM-2-2E319, Room 2E115, Washington, DC 20202.  Be sure to include the Docket Number: ED-2014-ICCD-0125.  The deadline to submit comments is October 27, 2014.

Background
As has been reported in the media, some colleges use the list of colleges that students supply on their FAFSA forms in an attempt to ascertain the students’ likelihood of attending the institution if accepted. Specifically, colleges make note of the order in which students list the institutions to which their results are to be sent and assume that the order conveys evidence of the student’s preference.   NACAC has been able to confirm independently that some colleges use the FAFSA college lists for recruitment and admission purposes. NACAC also confirmed through contact with its colleges and with the Office of Federal Student Aid (FSA) that the college lists are routinely provided to colleges, along with the other information submitted by students via the FAFSA. While colleges regularly use information supplied by students, either directly to the college or voluntarily through lead generation sources (such as the agencies that administer the SAT/ACT admission tests and various online college information Web portals) for the purpose of identifying a student’s demonstrated interest in attending, students are made aware upon submission of their personal information that the information will be shared with colleges for use during the recruitment and admission process. However, students are not made aware that information supplied via the FAFSA may be used by colleges in the recruitment and admission process, only that the information will be used in the process of administering financial aid.

Concerns
The association believes that students should not be compelled by colleges to disclose their college preferences during the application process. NACAC’s Statement of Principles of Good Practice (SPGP) – the standards by which the association’s more than 13,000 members operate — dictates that member colleges shall — not require or ask candidates or the secondary schools to indicate the order of the candidates’ college or university preferences (SPGP Mandatory Practice, Section II.B.2).

While students may volunteer this information, the association believes that a student’s right to keeping such information private is an integral part of maintaining a fair admission process. In the past, NACAC has found that institutions exercised leverage over students by asking them to disclose their college preferences, forcing students into the uncomfortable situation of disclosing information that could count against them in the application review process, or being less-than-truthful on their application about their preferences.

As evidenced by media reports and our initial inquiries into the matter, colleges are utilizing the information disclosed by students without their knowledge or consent to make informed guesses about the students’ college preferences. We believe this interferes with students’ ability to navigate the admission process in as fair a manner as possible. NACAC believes that the FSA could remedy this situation by simply not disclosing the students’ college lists to colleges.

NACAC has communicated with the National Association of Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) and the National Association of State Student Grant and Aid Programs (NASSGAP) about this issue to ensure that we are not recommending a course of action that would affect their ability to effectively and efficiently administer federal and state aid to students.

We understand from these conversations that the student lists are an important component in administering state aid programs in some states. However, we maintain that in the interest of students, FSA modify the FAFSA in one of the following ways:

1.    Refrain from sending students’ college lists to the colleges; or
2.    Inform students that their lists can be sent to colleges (preferably in alphabetical or random
order), and allow students to either opt-in or opt-out of such a
transmission.

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Top Colleges That Enroll Rich, Middle Class and Poor

From The New York Times:

A new index measures which colleges have the most economically diverse student bodies — and charge the least to lower-income students.

Check out the list here.

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